Episode 83 – Wednesday, 7/15/20

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My Art for Sale: www.artfinder.com/stressart

My Website: www.stressart.com

Multi-Layered Ceramics by Artist Heesoo Lee Express the Movements of Land and Sea

Article by Grace Ebert on Colossal.

HOW MANY BOOKS CAN A KINDLE HOLD?

Article by Tika Viteri on BookRiot.

The 21 best arguments for wearing a mask

Article by Mark Wilson on FastCompany.

[Source Images: onlyyouqj/iStock, 3M]

Did You Know That You Can Visit the House from the “American Gothic” Painting?

Article by Rain Noe on Core 77.

Great Art Explained: New Series Offers Fresh Look At World Famous Artworks

Article by Joanne Schurvell on Forbes.

A man looks at Guernica by Pablo Picasso during the partial reopening of the Reina Sofia Museum, …  
GETTY IMAGES

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angelika moroz – Painting

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Episode 77 – Wednesday, 7/1/20

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My Art for Sale: www.artfinder.com/stressart

My Website: www.stressart.com

BEhold Octavia Butler’s Motivational Notes to Self

Article on Open Culture.

14 New Books to Read in One Sitting

Article by Kimberley Laws on BookBub.

lie back and relax in your own zen garden with the dhyan chaise lounge concept

On DesignBoom – This is Super EXTRA!

ART APPRISH CORNER
jerome lagarrigue – Painting

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Episode 61 – Saturday, 5/30/20

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My Art for Sale: www.artfinder.com/stressart

My Website: www.stressart.com

ART SALE

Black People Need Stronger White Allies — Here’s How You Can Be One

Article by Stephanie Long on Refinery29.

Magazine Collage Walls Have Grown Up, and Here’s What They Look Like Now

Article by Marlen Komar on Apartment Therapy.

What Does Art Have to Do With the Coronavirus?

Opinion Piece by Judy Chicago at The New York Times.

Teen Vogue: How to safely and ethically film police misconduct

Article by PALIKA MAKAM on Teen Vogue.

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alexis arnold

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Episode 59 – Wednesday, 5/27/20

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My Art for Sale: www.artfinder.com/stressart

My Website: www.stressart.com

Healthcare workers are saving lives. Here’s how you can send them your gratitude.

Article by Rebeca Ruiz on Mashable.

Freaky Twilight Doll May Actually Be Haunted

Article by Hazel Cills on Jezebel.

Photo courtesy of Forks, WA Chamber of Commerce

Talk Art Is The Podcast That’ll Get You Through Lockdown — Its Founders Russell Tovey And Robert Diament Share Their Favorite Artists

Article by Felicity Carter on Forbes.

Support local artists and give back at the same time with these face masks

Article by Jennifer Markert on Mashable.

Winc will hook you up with 12 of the world’s best wines for less than $8 a bottle

Article on Boing Boing – Winc is not a sponsor of this blog…FYI. ;0)

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agnes grochulska

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Episode 58 – Monday, 5/25/20

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My Art for Sale: www.artfinder.com/stressart

My Website: www.stressart.com

Check out these messy, startling portraits of some of your favorite dead authors.

Article by Aaron Robertson on Literary Hub. Portraits by Zach Mendosa.

Six face masks that are well-made and available right now

Article by Lauren Steele on FastCompany.

You can now turn a selfie into a work of art inspired by Van Gogh, Basquiat or Kahlo

Article on Arts & Culture.

This is a picture of ME with the Frida Kahlo filter.

Louise Bourgeois’s Iconic Spider Sculptures Have a Surprising History

Article by Clair Selvin on ArtNews.

One of my favorite artists and one of my very favorite sculptures!

‘jewelry for cleaning’ features brass litter rings designed by studio b severin

Article on DesignBoom

litter rings
all images © studio b severin

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ewa podles

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Episode 55 – Wednesday, 5/20/20

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My Art for Sale: www.artfinder.com/stressart

My Website: www.stressart.com

Home Muralfest

Enric Sant

‘Covivert’ Personality Type Excels In Isolation, Psychology Experts Share

Article By Mikelle Leow on Taxi.

People On TikTok Discovered That Jeeps Have “Easter Eggs” Hidden Somewhere On The Vehicle And Are Showing Them Off

Article by Farrah Penn on BuzzFeed.

SUSPENDED BODY VISORS THAT WILL KEEP YOU SOCIAL AND SOCIALLY DISTANT

Article BY RUCHI THUKRAL on Yanko Design.

Empty Classic Paintings to Illustrate Corona Virus Pandemic

Article on Fubiz.

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kristen ide

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Episode 51 – Wednesday, 5/13/20

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Genesis Tramaine at Almine Rech

Article by Halima Taha on Contemporary Art Daily.

Why the Tuskegee Airmen Were So Badass

Article by Miss Celania on Neatorama.

The 332nd Fighter Group of the U.S. Fifteenth Air Force in World War II are better known now as the Tuskegee Airmen. As bombers flew over Nazi Germany, they wanted the best escorts to protect them, and that meant the Tuskegee Airmen. The group flew 1,500 combat mission and 200 escort mission during the war, with more than 15,000 individual sorties, garnering 850 awards. Their motivation was to win the war, but it was also to prove their worth because so much was riding on their success for the folks back home.   

In the late 1930s, the German army was spreading through Europe. Although the U.S. hadn’t yet declared war, thousands of Americans were signing up to fight overseas as pilots. But at the time, racist stereotypes were widespread in the U.S. military. The Armed Forces were segregated, with black servicemen often restricted to working menial labor jobs. Nowhere was this inequality more apparent than in the Army Air Corps, which didn’t just segregate black servicemen from their white counterparts, but outright excluded them.

To justify, military leaders pointed to a racist Army War College report released after the First World War. The report claimed black people were an inferior “sub-species” of human who lacked the intelligence and courage to serve in combat, especially in challenging roles like pilots.

For decades, civil rights leaders had been fighting against such prejudice, lobbying for equal treatment in the military. The pressure mounted when the U.S. started preparing for war. In 1938, anticipating the need for more pilots, the Army Air Corps began establishing flight schools at colleges all across the country, excluding black schools. However, advocates’ efforts were about to pay off. In 1940, while campaigning for his third presidential term, Franklin Delano Roosevelt promised to start the first training program for black military pilots.

The 332nd Fighter Group was an experiment with long-lasting consequences. Read how the Tuskegee Airmen approached the tough training and rough treatment at Popular Mechanics. -via Damn Interesting 

(Image credit: USAAF)

These are the ’10 plain truths’ about the coronavirus pandemic, according to former CDC Director Dr. Tom Frieden

Article By Allen Kim and Amanda Watts, CNN.

I Kind of Regret Getting an Antibody Test

Article by Shannon Palus on Slate.

Why the Art World Is Rediscovering Female Abstract Expressionist Michael West

Article by Karen Chernick on ART SY.

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monica kane

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Episode 30 – Monday, 4/6/20

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The Four Possible Timelines for Life Returning to Normal

This is such an interesting article. Please read!

Article by Joe Pinsker on The Atlantic

SWIVELING MIRROR INSTALLATION SKEWS PERSPECTIVES OF HISTORIC VENETIAN ARCHITECTURE

A Thick Braid Cascades Down a Marina Abramović-Inspired Porcelain Collection

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Lilia Orlova-Holmes

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IMPORTANT! PLEASE READ!

A Message from the Front Lines of the Pandemic

I took this from a Scientific America article by Joshua Lerner.

Joshua Lerner is an emergency physician practicing in north-central Massachusetts.

In one of the most vivid scenes in the HBO miniseries Chernobyl, soldiers dressed in leather smocks ran out into radioactive areas to literally shovel radioactive material out of harm’s way. Horrifically underprotected, they suited up anyway to do their job. In later scenes, soldiers fashioned protection from scrap metal out of desperation while patrolling other hazardous areas.

Please don’t tell me that in the richest country in the world in the 21st century, I’m supposed to work in a fictionalized Soviet-era disaster zone and fashion my own face mask out of cloth while others in our country hoard supplies for personal use and profiteering as so-called leaders sit around in meetings hearing themselves talk. I ran to a bedside the other day to intubate a crashing, likely COVID, patient. Two respiratory therapists and two nurses were already at the bedside. That’s five N95 masks, five gowns, five face shields and 10 gloves for one patient at one time. I saw probably 15–20 patients during that shift. If we are going to start rationing supplies, what percentage of them should I wear precautions for?

Make no mistake, the CDC’s loosening of personal protection equipment (PPE) guidelines is a result of our country not being prepared. Loosening guidelines increases health care workers’ risk, but the decision is done to allow us to keep working. It is done for the public benefit—so I can continue to work no matter the personal cost to me or my family (and my health care family). It is easier to loosen standards than it is to adhere to them. Sending health care workers to the front line asking them to cover their face with a bandana is akin to sending a soldier to the front in a t-shirt and flip flops. 

I don’t want talk. I don’t want assurances. I want action. I want boxes of N95 masks piling up in hospitals, donated from the people who hoarded them or from stockpiles of less critical use. I want nonclinical hospital administrators lining up in the ER asking if they can stock shelves to make sure that when I need to rush into a room, the drawer of PPE equipment I open isn’t empty. I want them showing up in the ER asking “how can I help” instead of offering shallow plans conceived by someone who has spent far too long in an ivory tower and not long enough in the trenches. I want them in the trenches beside me for this fight.  We need as many helping hands as we can get.  

I want multibillion-dollar companies like 3M halting all production of any product that isn’t PPE to focus on PPE manufacturing. I want a company like Amazon, with its logistics mastery (it can drop a package to your door less than 24 hours after you ordered it), halting its two-day delivery of toilet paper to the highest bidder in order to help deliver available PPE supplies fast and efficiently to my brothers and sisters in arms across this nation who need them. 

I want Procter & Gamble, and the makers of other soaps and detergents, stepping up too. We need detergent to clean scrubs, hospital linens and gowns. We need disinfecting wipes to clean desk and computer surfaces. What about plastics manufacturers? Plastic gowns aren’t some high-tech device—they are long shirts/smocks, made out of plastic. Let’s get on it. Face shields. Nitrile gloves. Let’s go.

Money talks in this country. Executives and millionaires, could you spare some money to buy back some masks from the hoarders and then drop them off at the nearest hospital? Nobody condones price gouging, but nurses and paramedics cannot afford to buy a mask for $50; maybe you can.

I love biotechnology and research, but we need to divert viral culture media for COVID testing and research. We need biotechnology manufacturing ready and able to ramp up if and when treatments or vaccines are developed. Our Botox supply isn’t critical, but our antibiotic supply is. We need to be able to make more plastic endotracheal tubes, not more silicone breast implants. And we need ventilators, a lot of them. Tesla engineers can you get to work?

Let’s see all that. Then we can talk about how we all played our part in this fight. Netflix and chill is not enough while my family, friends and colleagues are out there fighting. Our country won two world wars because the entire country mobilized. We outproduced and out-manufactured everyone else while our soldiers outfought the enemy. Today, we need that level of commitment again. Make no mistake: we are at war. Health care workers are your soldiers, and the battle has just begun.